Mexico is one of the countries with more traditions and culture for this festivity. We will tell you why.

The Christmas traditions in this country are unique, they have distinctive characteristics that differentiate it from any other in the world, this, due to the fusion of two cultures: the indigenous and the Spanish.

The “piñata”: Why do Mexicans have fun breaking a decorated mold of clay filled up with fruit?

In Mexico, the “piñata” is more than a decorated mold of clay, it has its own symbolism. The faith of this culture is represented by the bandage that covers the person who will be breaking it; the stick that its used for this purpose is the force of virtue to the adversity and the sweets and fruit that are in it represent the truth and the grants given when persevering with faith in all aspects of life.

Both children and adults line up to break the “piñata” while singing traditional songs and anxiously wait for it to be broken to catch the sweets and candies that are inside.

The “pastorela”: In Mexico, the “pastorelas” are an opportunity for children and adults to presume their acting skills while telling the story that counts the battle between Saint Michael and Lucifer: Good versus Evil.

Children, adults and friends have fun featuring angels, demons, shepherds and even animals in this interpretation of traditional work that goes from generation to generation, and that shows that good always defeats evil when following the right path.

The “posadas”: The posadas take place from December 16th to the 24th. The streets are full of people from the neighborhoods nearby who gathered together and perform a small pilgrimage guided with candles and the lyrics of the traditional “posada” song. It symbolizes the time when Maria and Jose where searching for a place to stay when Jesus was going to be born.

After someone allows the people to enter the house, the “piñata” is broken and everybody enjoy a delicious dinner with “tamales”, “buñuelos”, “churros”, punch and hot cocoa.

The “nacimiento”: Just as in some countries the Christmas tree can’t be missed, in Mexico the “nacimiento” is essential. Mexicans have a lot of faith and it is important for them to set up the “nacimiento” that represents when Jesus was born.

It stays right under the Christmas tree from December 16th until February 2nd when the holidays end.

The Christmas dinner: Right after the clock announces the birth of Jesus, all the families gather together to enjoy a delicious banquet that is composed by traditional dishes such as the “romeritos”, the stuffed turkey and for dessert the “buñuelos” or the apple salad. To accompany the meal, there is always a jar of punch, “champurrado”, or the traditional “atole”.

 

These are just some of the most representative Christmas traditions in the country. You have to start planning the next holiday in Mexico, and live it like a local!

"> A CHRISTMAS IN MEXICO Mexico is one of the countries with more traditions and culture for this festivity. We will tell you why.

The Christmas traditions in this country are unique, they have distinctive characteristics that differentiate it from any other in the world, this, due to the fusion of two cultures: the indigenous and the Spanish.

The “piñata”: Why do Mexicans have fun breaking a decorated mold of clay filled up with fruit?

In Mexico, the “piñata” is more than a decorated mold of clay, it has its own symbolism. The faith of this culture is represented by the bandage that covers the person who will be breaking it; the stick that its used for this purpose is the force of virtue to the adversity and the sweets and fruit that are in it represent the truth and the grants given when persevering with faith in all aspects of life.

Both children and adults line up to break the “piñata” while singing traditional songs and anxiously wait for it to be broken to catch the sweets and candies that are inside.

The “pastorela”: In Mexico, the “pastorelas” are an opportunity for children and adults to presume their acting skills while telling the story that counts the battle between Saint Michael and Lucifer: Good versus Evil.

Children, adults and friends have fun featuring angels, demons, shepherds and even animals in this interpretation of traditional work that goes from generation to generation, and that shows that good always defeats evil when following the right path.

The “posadas”: The posadas take place from December 16th to the 24th. The streets are full of people from the neighborhoods nearby who gathered together and perform a small pilgrimage guided with candles and the lyrics of the traditional “posada” song. It symbolizes the time when Maria and Jose where searching for a place to stay when Jesus was going to be born.

After someone allows the people to enter the house, the “piñata” is broken and everybody enjoy a delicious dinner with “tamales”, “buñuelos”, “churros”, punch and hot cocoa.

The “nacimiento”: Just as in some countries the Christmas tree can’t be missed, in Mexico the “nacimiento” is essential. Mexicans have a lot of faith and it is important for them to set up the “nacimiento” that represents when Jesus was born.

It stays right under the Christmas tree from December 16th until February 2nd when the holidays end.

The Christmas dinner: Right after the clock announces the birth of Jesus, all the families gather together to enjoy a delicious banquet that is composed by traditional dishes such as the “romeritos”, the stuffed turkey and for dessert the “buñuelos” or the apple salad. To accompany the meal, there is always a jar of punch, “champurrado”, or the traditional “atole”.

 

These are just some of the most representative Christmas traditions in the country. You have to start planning the next holiday in Mexico, and live it like a local!

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A CHRISTMAS IN MEXICO

09-02-2017

Mexico is one of the countries with more traditions and culture for this festivity. We will tell you why.

The Christmas traditions in this country are unique, they have distinctive characteristics that differentiate it from any other in the world, this, due to the fusion of two cultures: the indigenous and the Spanish.

The “piñata”: Why do Mexicans have fun breaking a decorated mold of clay filled up with fruit?

In Mexico, the “piñata” is more than a decorated mold of clay, it has its own symbolism. The faith of this culture is represented by the bandage that covers the person who will be breaking it; the stick that its used for this purpose is the force of virtue to the adversity and the sweets and fruit that are in it represent the truth and the grants given when persevering with faith in all aspects of life.

Both children and adults line up to break the “piñata” while singing traditional songs and anxiously wait for it to be broken to catch the sweets and candies that are inside.

The “pastorela”: In Mexico, the “pastorelas” are an opportunity for children and adults to presume their acting skills while telling the story that counts the battle between Saint Michael and Lucifer: Good versus Evil.

Children, adults and friends have fun featuring angels, demons, shepherds and even animals in this interpretation of traditional work that goes from generation to generation, and that shows that good always defeats evil when following the right path.

The “posadas”: The posadas take place from December 16th to the 24th. The streets are full of people from the neighborhoods nearby who gathered together and perform a small pilgrimage guided with candles and the lyrics of the traditional “posada” song. It symbolizes the time when Maria and Jose where searching for a place to stay when Jesus was going to be born.

After someone allows the people to enter the house, the “piñata” is broken and everybody enjoy a delicious dinner with “tamales”, “buñuelos”, “churros”, punch and hot cocoa.

The “nacimiento”: Just as in some countries the Christmas tree can’t be missed, in Mexico the “nacimiento” is essential. Mexicans have a lot of faith and it is important for them to set up the “nacimiento” that represents when Jesus was born.

It stays right under the Christmas tree from December 16th until February 2nd when the holidays end.

The Christmas dinner: Right after the clock announces the birth of Jesus, all the families gather together to enjoy a delicious banquet that is composed by traditional dishes such as the “romeritos”, the stuffed turkey and for dessert the “buñuelos” or the apple salad. To accompany the meal, there is always a jar of punch, “champurrado”, or the traditional “atole”.

 

These are just some of the most representative Christmas traditions in the country. You have to start planning the next holiday in Mexico, and live it like a local!


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